Historical Figure a writer’s mind can be a powerful thing…!

Hence, it acquires a lot more than intelligence and the ability to write. It is a combination of the author’s deepest feelings captured by his/her life’s circumstances of the present and the past, that leads itself to readable words on a piece of paper. Sadegh Hedayat is among the most remarkable writers of Iran whose works can be identified by this notion.

He was born in Tehran in 1903 to a well respected family. According to his brother, Mahmoud, Sadegh was a very lovable child whose sweet speech and
wit was always admired. Though, by the age of six, he displayed a lack of desire to play with children of his age and became an introvert.

He finished his secondary education at a French school, St. Louise Academy in Tehran, where he took full responsibility of writing, publishing, and distributing the school’s newspaper. Thereafter, he was sent to Europe on a government scholarship to study dentistry. He eventually gave up that goal and focused on the study of pre-Islamic language and literature. He explored the works of many well-known writers and admirers such as Omar Khayam, Dostoevski, and Rainer Maria Rilke.

Hedayat was fascinated by the philosophies of Buddha and Zoroaster (Zartosht). He published “ “Ensan va Heyvan”” (“”Man and Animal””) in 1924
and became a vegetarian in defense of the animal kingdom against the ravage
of men. Later on he distributed “”Favayedeh Giyah Khari”” (The Advantage of Vegetarianism) in Berlin.

Through Rilke’s admiration of “”death””, Hedayat became intrigued with the “”knowledge of the unknown.”” So much in fact that he tried to commit suicide
in 1927 by drowning himself in River Marne in Paris. In a letter to his brother, Hedayat wrote, “”I did something really crazy, but luckily it did not do me in!”” The cause for his behavior still remains unknown, but one could guess that he must have led a complicated life.

Upon his return to Iran in 1930, Hedayat’s first line of short stories called “”Zindeh Be Goor”” (Buried alive) was distributed, but he felt isolated from freely putting his thoughts down. He left for India around 1936 where he published his masterpiece “”Buf-i Kur”” (Blind Owl). The novel was withheld from publication in Iran until 1941, due to the controversial issues that it contained.

The “”Blind Owl”” says a lot about Hedayat’s character and his state of mind:

The novel’s central emphasis is on the modernized women of his era. The dual image of women as the virtuous and the prostitute is not well absorbed by the male standards of the 30’s. Hedayat’s frustration with this phenomenon sets women as the core problem of life and death. Since, women are the birth-givers; they can not be the heavenly creatures forbidden from misconduct or sexual intimacy. The author’s inability to deal with this realism brings him to a stage of psychological disturbance.

By the end of 1930’s, Hedayat’s career as a writer reached the end of its lifespan. His addiction to drugs and alcohol was a gateway to self destruction as a writer and eventually himself. On April 4, 1951, Hedayat ended his miserable days by committing suicide for the second and last time.

Aside from being a writer, Sadegh Hedayat was also a painter and an admirer
of music. Although his literary works seem disturbing, even as we speak, his academic ambition as an artist, his creative mind, and his recognition as the best writer of his time, makes Sadegh Hedayat an unforgettable figure in our history!

Forugh Farrokhzad

Thus far, I have introduced you to a number of legendary men
in our history. Stereotypically, it’s rare for us to view women as great heroes and legends. This month I would like to introduce you to a woman who has given birth to the power of self-expression in ancient Iran: a freedom of speech foreign to women of her time!

Born in Tehran in 1935, Forugh Farrokhzad is one of the rare cases of Iranian women who defeated the rigid image of feminism in the early 19th century.

She discovered her talents at the age of 15 and attended Kamal-ol-Molk’s Technical School seeking knowledge in the fields of painting and dressmaking. Although both subjects were appealing to her, (specially painting which became a second avenue of her talents), she captured self expression in poetry. At the age of 16, she married her cousin Parviz Shapoor and gave birth to her only child, Kamyar a year later. Within two years after her son’s birth, her marriage failed and she left her son and husband to pursue her passion as an independent woman. The greatest importance in Farrokhzad’s three stages of development as a woman: her marriage, divorce, and abandoning of her child, was her personal declaration of conflicts between social expectations and her own tendencies:

It was I who laughed at futile slurs.

The one that was branded by shame

I shall be what I’m called to be, I said

But, oh the misery that “woman” is

my name.

Her decision to pursue poetry was against the norm of women at that time; hence, it attracted much attention and opponents. “The Captive”, “The Wedding Band”, and “Call to Arms” resemble her perspectives on conventional marriage, difficulty of women in Iran, and her incapability to live a conventional life as a mother and a wife. She suffered a nervous breakdown in September of 1955 that led her to a psychiatric clinic. Following her recovery, she went to Europe for a period of nine months during which she studied film and became acquainted with writer and cinematographer, Ebrahim Golestan. Her most famous work, “The House is Black” was filmed in 1962 with the help of her colleagues who believe that it represented Farrokhzad’s view of contemporary Iran.

She has published five volumes of her poetry, 4 of which became available during her lifespan and the fifth volume that was published after her death: “Prisoner” (1955), “The Wall” (1957), “Rebellion” (1958), “Another Birth” (1964), and “Let Us Believe in the Beginning of the Cold Season” (1965). Farrokhzad was killed in 1967 in a fatal car accident at the early age of 32.
Her tomb in Zahiro-Doleh cemetery in Tehran is regularly visited by thousands
of her most loyal fans.

Forugh Farrokhzad is one of the most distinct women in Iran’s history. She
has been able to defeat the social norms of symbolic restraint in woman’s
self –expression. In one of her most famous quotes she says, “Until you reach
your liberated and free self, isolated from constricting selves of others, you will not accomplish anything. Art is strongest when it avails itself only to those who thoroughly surrender their whole existence to it”.

Her poems are an effect of emotional and psychological frustrations that gave
her the strength to turn “from personal to collective, from the female to the human, and from the private to the public.”

She has given the women of her country the courage to declare a voice by encouraging them to understand their state of oppression while giving them a reason to fight silence!

The Premier of “The Keeper: The Legend of Omar Khayyam”

Young Professionals in the Community

John Fuentes Photography
John Fuentes has been a freelance photographer for the past 15 years. He has won several competitive awards for scenic, nature, and special effects photography in Alaska while stationed in Eielson AFB, serving in the United States Air Force.

His passions for artistically capturing time and events have been recognized by his clients and peers.

With a career in the Hospitality Industry, he gained the necessary interpersonal skills to capture his clients at their best. From his charismatic demeanor and caring for each client, he will ensure your comfort to gain the ultimate portrait for you.

John specializes in “Story Telling Photography” or “Candid Photography” that captures children, individuals, couples, and families within their environment or selected location. Also, with the assistance of CYRUS Productions in Laguna Hills, you have the option of a “Traditional Style”, studio controlled portrait. John has also added to his resume Weddings, Engagements, and Personal/Professional Event Photography.

Interview with Kourosh Pirnazar
by: Shaghayegh Farsijani

Tell us a little about what you do?

I do storyboards for Gold Pictures for a new TV project called SIN. I work there as a Production Assistant, so when they go out to shoot documentaries or any other outdoor shoots, such as corporate videos, I will go and do it under their name.

How did you get into Film?

I orginally started to become an animator but the problem there was as an animator you have to be really consistent; by drawing the same thing over and over again with small changes. I could draw both pictures but they just weren’t alike, so I decided to go into “stop motion animation” which is when figures are really there and you just have to shoot them. That was the first time I actually got behind the camera and decided to direct and set up shots. From then on I went into movie making. The movie that encouraged me to go into this field was “Saving Private Ryan”. The way the movie was made just fascinated me, so throughout high school I made short films with my cousins and friends. I went to the film school at Cal State Long Beach for four years and will be graduating this semester. While I was studying I worked on short films and documentaries and that is when I met a lady by the name of Melissa who helped me get this internship.

How did you become familiar with OCPC?

Exactly one year ago my mom brought the magazine home and I started flipping through the pages when I saw Mr. Danosian and I said, “Oh my god! That is my art teacher!” From then on I started reading the magazine every month.

Final thoughts?

It is good to get involved with this magazine or just the Persian community in general because no matter what you are involved with, you are helping the community. As you know, the LA and Orange County area have a huge Persian community so you should do a lot to get involved.

Abu Ali-Sina

Those who leave a trace in our history are those who leave an impression in our hearts!

Mohammad Ghaffari, known as Kamal-ol-Molk, is one of the most admired and distinct artists of Iran. His artwork has been a gateway to new horizons for generations still to come.

Talent was in his blood, for he was born into a family of artists. He developed an interest in calligraphy (writing) and painting. At an early age in his childhood years, he drew charcoal sketches on the walls of his bedroom which may still be evident in that very house.

Once finishing his primary schooling in Kashan, Mohammad moved to Tehran
to further his studies in Dar-ol-Fonoon School of Art. Among Naseredin Shah’s many visits to the school, he became familiar with Mohammad’s gifted talent and invited him to the court (darbar). During this period, he created over 170 paintings of landscape, royal camps, portraits of important people, and different parts of the palace.

He was first given the title “Naghash Bashi” for his acknowledgements but later with his eminent progress he became known as “Kamal-ol-Molk” (the most valuable worthiness). Kamal-ol Molk is known for a number of his most famous work during his stay at the shah’s court. The most magnificent piece among these is “The Mirror Hall” which took six years to complete (1885-1891). In this lively spirited painting, Naseredin Shah is portrayed sitting in the middle of Mirror Hall of Golestan Palace. The reflection of light and shadow of objects in the mirrors, as well as the reflection of the mirrors in one another, are so delicately painted that the observer is left surrounded by wonders and unspeakable words. He also drew a self portrait in 1920 which is also highly credited.

During Mozaffareddin Shah’s ruling, Kamal-ol Molk was facing undesirable painting requests; but, he dealt with the situation subtly, refusing to accept the offer. This rejection caused tension among both sides. Furthermore, he was falsely accused of stealing two pieces of gold from the palace. His heart could not bear such pain, thus he set out for Europe during which he enhanced his art. Mozaffareddin Shah’s second visit to Europe and the love that he had for his county made him return to Iran after four years.

With the growth of art appreciation in Iran, Kamal-ol-Molk established “Sanaye Mostazrafeh Art School” in Tehran, better known as Kamal-ol-Molk Art School. He introduced a variety of arts such as carpet weaving, mosaic designing, and woodwork to his students. Despite his academic teachings, he also taught his students about life, morals, love, and humanity. The love that he had for the young generation went beyond his professional standards. At many times, he stayed late at school teaching, and selflessly helped poor students in need with a portion of his monthly salary.

With his knowledge and dedication, he trained competent students who have become the famous artists of today, faces like Esmaeel Ashtiani, Ali Mohammad Heidarian, Mohsen Soheili and others. The achievement of these artists received much attention both in Iran and Europe. In 1927, due to further uncompromising with the Pahlavi Dynasty, he resigned from teaching and painting altogether and assigned his position to one of his most acknowledged students, Hussein-Ali Vaziri. Kamal-ol-Molk moved to Neishaboor where he lived the remainder of his life and passed away in 1940 at the age of 93.

Kamal-ol-Molk gave life to the extent and understanding of art in Iran. Iranian painting was limited to Miniature during and before the Qajar Era. Hence, he opened a door of opportunity to the young generation of artists succeeding him. In addition, he is remembered as a man of great value and morals, whose honor and love for his country had no boundary. He has left a piece of his soul in each of his paintings and will remain as a distinct artist in Iran’s history.

Marsha Mehran’s new novel Pomegranate Soup

After our December cover of OCPC featuring up and coming Iranian actor Nicolas Guilak, we were flooded with emails! Everyone wanted to know who this handsome new rising star in Hollywood was. He had just starred in an independent film entitled “Will Unplugged” and a year before he had caught our attention as the lead in NBC’s made-for-TV movie Saving Jessica Lynch as Mohammed Al-Rehaief, the Iraqi father and husband who risked his own family’s safety to help Lynch, leading to her heroic rescue on April 1, 2003.

Now six months later we wanted to catch up with Guilak to see what he is
up to…

Nicholas Guilak, just finished his final performance as the recurring guest-star
on Fox’s hit drama “24:Day 4”. A few of his previous credits include playing
the lead in NBC’s highly controversial drama “Saving Jessica Lynch” and
starring in “Homeland Security”. He’s guest-starred in more than a dozen
popular shows from CSI: Miami, Navy”NCIS”, Threat Matrix to JAG, The Agency, “24:Day 2,” War Stories and She Spies (which was directed by Reza Badiyi). Nicholas is a founding member of Big Dog Little Dog Productions, a nonprofit theatre company in Los Angeles, which was voted top 5 by Bravo in the year 2000. He is a big advocate of theatre and because of scheduling issues has not been able to do a play in the past few years. His next project is
to produce and star in a theatre production of Howard Korder’s dark comedy “Boy’s Life” for a summer opening in Hollywood. He is being considered for a few big feature films – we’ll give you the scoop as soon as we find out!

DUI Cases by Kourosh Jafari

Nowadays when most people are leading stressful lives, feeling overwhelmed with their responsibilities and daily activities, the value of meditation shines forth.

It’s time to choose meditation as a way of life, to help you understand better who you are, and what your needs are. Perhaps, after careful consideration you would choose a different life then the one you have created for yourself.

We are always searching for peace, we work hard to create the life we think we want to earn more so we can have a better car, a bigger home, better furniture, so we can be comfortable to finally be at peace. But, the more we engage in the worldly materialistic pursuit, the more conditioned we become to its complicated, never ending demands and that’s when we become a stranger to our true essence, which is peace and serenity.

That’s why I have created these simple organic excercises that will bring you closer to yourself. It’s taking a short vecation from the world outside to reach and touch who we really are within. Don’t be surprised if this journey begins to feel all too familiar to you!

Write the word meditation in bold letters on your to-do list. Everyday sit quietly for a few minutes, close your eyes and focus your attention on your breath, stay with your breath for a couple of minutes, now invite yourself to be at peace, allow your muscles to let go of all tensions and your thoughts to slow down.

Now you will begin to find yourself in a more peaceful space. Use this space to find out how you feel, are you truly pleased with your life? Re-evaluate your values and if you choose, make some adjustments.

1. For the start, let’s plan your day in a way that pleases you, in other words add an activity that serves you better. What do you enjoy doing? For instance, if you like nature, take yourself somewhere beautiful by the ocean or perhaps you choose the park or the forest and if you are really short of time go to your own backyard or balcony.

2. Take a deep breath, now for couple of minutes be aware of your breaths as they come and go, then slowly start to feel your own presence; notice yourself, focus your attention on what is going on inside of you.

3. Now, ask yourself: How you feel? Does it feel good to be out here experiencing yourself in nature? If the answer is yes, your brain has just sent the message of peace and serenity to your nervous system.

Here is another beneficial exercise.

1. Every night before you go to sleep sit quietly for a few minutes, take some deeper longer breathes.

2. Bring your awareness on your breath, love and nurture yourself, feel this love for yourself deep in the chore of your being and stay in this vibration for a few minutes.

3. Now, feel the shift in your energy and let it absorb into your cells.

With this simple exercise, you sent the message of love and kindness to your nervous system, as a result your nerves begin to let go a bit and allow you to experience the peace within. At this time truly let go of all thoughts and ideas and connect to yourself on a deep level and while you feel the connection, ask yourself for a peaceful life. You know you deserve it!

Yes, peace and joy is within us and you have always longed for it, stop looking for it outside of you, once you find it merge with it, lose yourself in it, allow your cells to dance in this blessed joyful light and finally radiate this peace and joy to the world around you.

Experiencing Iran

It is 1 P.M. and you just got off the plane. Extremely tired, exhausted and drained are the only feelings going through your head. The hot, dry air, the heavy luggage, the noise and the wait is making every moment tougher. Making your way towards the arrival doors you suddenly see a dozen people with big, happy smiles anxiously waiting to welcome you. Then you realize every minute is passing by so fast and you don’t even feel the pain you had minutes ago; all of a sudden all you see is a bunch of people – or should I say 5-6 cars – following you home, making you feel as special as a newlywed bride!

There is no such thing as “material happiness” in Iran. Relationships are very pure and real. People don’t need to know each other to bind. When you’re in the bakery, grocery store, shopping center, or even getting a ride in a taxi, you always see friendly faces chatting with each other. Conversations start when you are least expecting them; exchanging the latest happenings in the city. Taxi drivers are the best source of news because all day long they get to listen to passengers. Closeness and friendship goes beyond what stands out in a city. All in all, in Iran’s version of ‘New York City’, people still bring about the old ways of warmth and kindness… and enjoy every single second they spend together.
What do young people really do for fun? The nightlife in Tehran isn’t made very public but the inside scoop is that the young community enjoys themselves. Hangouts such as coffee shops, restaurants and juice stops get packed with loads of people on Thursday and Friday nights. People stay out late enjoying their time with friends or family at places such as Abmeeveh Tochaal, with their famous “sheer pesteh”, fast food places like Behrouz, Burger Teen and Feri Kasif, as well as places like Darband and Park Jamshidieh. The next stop would be a hookah/teahouse to lay back and relax with what is left of the night. Where do the others go? The rest are at house parties with the best music and some of the best looking guys and girls you could ever find. You don’t have to make plans for your weekend – they are already planned out for you!

Having a good time and going to some parties can turn out to be nothing but trouble. Some young people have to go through a lot and be alert so that nothing goes wrong. Sometimes parties or hang out places are interrupted not just for having loud music and waking up the neighbors, but because of the whole idea of “partying”. Even while grabbing a cup of coffee with your friend you always have to be on top of everything. What is the bright side? Mostly all of them could manage and are smarter than it seems!

Oh! Who could leave out the unforgettable “Jordan” and “Fereshteh”! These two streets are supposedly known as the happening streets where everybody gets to know each other better. Put on one last touch of make-up and don’t forget to fill-up your car with enough gas to have some fun. Why? People circle the streets until they lose count! You pass by different cars and faces and get to have a little giggle or two with your friends!!

It really is a worthwhile vacation to visit Iran and get a taste of how people really have fun and entertain themselves. Aside from the historical and ancient aspect, which may take weeks to explore, the culture is so deep and authentic that it causes you to blend in very smoothly and comfortably. The pleasure of it will truly last you a lifetime…

The Cravery

As an artist who has lived and worked on several continents, I rely on
my world view to inform my inner mind. Living in Los Angeles, one of
the most iconoclastic cities of all, inspires me to draw upon my self-training and motivation to constantly produce unique, personal artworks. My conceptual pieces are a mixture of found objects and paint in a
three dimensional format, directly communicating my thoughts and representing my life. I invite you to look at the world through my eyes.

Farzad Kohan’s sculptures are characterized by gracefully bending figures, moving through space on a fluid journey.

The rough-hewn shapes, braided from a mixture of clay and wood chips laid over a wire frame, clearly represent our human core, free of gender, race, culture or anything else that we use to judge one another. Even the pieces that contain more than one figure exude a palpable sense of loneliness; no one touches, not even the aloof mother and child in “What Have We Done to Our Children?”

While his older works like “The System”—which traces a symbolic path through the many man-made rules and societal pressures a person faces in their lifetime, feature open-air compositions, his more recent pieces present restricted spaces populated by those same expressive beings. Ironically, by confining his dramas to black painted boxes, like a theatrical set designer’s diorama, Kohan has freed his characters. By making quite literal the “boxes” we put ourselves into, he allows the figures to transcend those limitations. In “Searching,” the solitary entity perches on top of his cage, arms outstretched. He may still be alone, but he is free.

Of this new stage in his art, Kohan comments, “What I’m trying to say now is that we place these regulations on ourselves without thinking twice. At the same time as they separate us from one another, they bind us together, so there’s an ambiguity to stripping away those exterior trappings. In the end, all we really have in common is our limited time on this planet. All we can control is how we spend that time. Will we separate ourselves, or will we seek out the common ground?”

Qara Qoyonlu and Aq Qoyonlu 1378-1508

These two confederations, known as the ‘’Black’’ and ‘’White’ sheep respectively, were groups which had originally formed part of the eleventh and twelfth century Central Asian immigration, and had settled in eastern ANatolla which became a ‘’sink’’ for turbulent and unwanted nomads. With the disintegration of the Mongol II Khan empire the Qara Qoyonlu were able to expand and control northwest Iran and much of Iraq, and although they bowed to Timur’s approach, they were able to hold on to the area and block any effective western Timurid aspirations.
The Aq Qoyonlu were situated further west in Anatolia, but after 1469 they were able to expand eastwards into Iran having defeated the Qara Qoyonlu and effectively controlled Iran and Iraq down to the Persian Gulf. They were mainly concerned with fighting the Ottomans and Anatolia, and were eventually crushed by these and the rising Safavid power.

One interesting feature of these turkmen confederations was their religious affinities. The Qara Qoyonlu were predominantly of the Shi’ite party, whereas the Aq Qoyonlu were Sunni Muslims, and it has been suggested that one of the reasons fo the eventual fall of the Aq Qoyonlu was the spread of Shi’ite propoganda among the various Turkish tribes in Anatolla by Safavids.

Of the monuments which can definitely be assigned to these confederations, the most important is the Blue Mosque at Tabriz. This mosque is particularly fascinating because of its plan and also because of the beautiful blue tile mosaic which gives it its name. The plan is unusual for Iran in that it is a covered mosque as opposed to a courtyard one, and the central dome is surrounded by a series of small domes, quite unlike any contemporary Iranian building, but strongly related to the Ottoman mosques. Thsi would certainly seem to indicate a major Anatolian connection through to the main Ottoman centers in western Turkey, as might well be expected given the common language and orgins.

The decoration of the Blue Mosque attained an incredible richness with deep lapis lazuli blue as the foundation upon which a series of carved arabesques wandered. Much of this is now destroyed, but enough remains to attest the skill of the craftsmen. The upper section of the mihrab chamber was entirely covered with a deep blue mosaic on which patterns were stencilled on gold, below which was a dado of immense slabs of alabaster.

Other Turkmen monuments in Iran include the Darb-i Imam shrine at Isfahan, some fine tilework in the Maydan Mosque at Kashan, and the tile mosaic in the courtyard of the Isfahan Jami’ Mosque. All of this, however can be regarded as a continuation of the Timurid style which was maintained in the eastern Iran until the end of the fifteenth century. The Ottoman-style plan of the Blue Mosque was a unique importation and had no major progeny in Iran, so that the Turkmen contribution to Iranian architecture lay mainly in continuing and maintaining already established traditions.

Already during the fifteenth century many of the extreme Timurid characteristics, the high dome and monumental scale, had been refined by Persian influence within Iran proper. the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were to see the triumph of Persian style and taste under major native dynasty, which paradoxically was Turkish speaking, but which emphasized its Iranian antecedents and sought to reform and consolidate the country as an Iranian entity.

The Safavids 1501 – 1732

In the early part of the fourteenth century Shaykh Safi established the Sufi order of the Safawiyya at Ardabil in Azarbayjan. This order flourished among the Turkic tribes in that area, and although it was probably Sunni in origin, the area has a historic tradition Shi’ism, and by the middle of the fifteenth century, at which time an intense propoganda was carried out among the tribes, and then leader was able to seize Azarbayjan from the Aq Qoyonlu in 1501, and withinf ten years was master of the whole of Iran, which he ruled as Shah Isma’il, and founded the Safavid monarchy.

Shah Isma’il was not only temporal ruler of the country, but also a major spiritual leader claiming descent from the family of the Prophet and an exalted status as representative of the Shi’i Imams. These ideas were accepted by their tribal followers, known as Qizil Bash because of the red caps they wore, and therefore Shi’ism became the state religion to which most of the population eventually adhered, although Azarbayjan was always a center of religious controversy. This policy also had a major political reason in that the Ottomans were devout Sunnis, and the religious difference helped to create a rallying point around which Iran was able to become a nationaly entity, and which has enabled it to survive practically unchanged geographically into modern times. The new Safavid state was surrounded by potential enemies, the Ottomans to the west, the Ozbegs to the northeast, and even at times the Mughals to the east. All of these were Sunnis and unrelenting in their hostility to the new Shi’i regime. As a result the northeast and northwest borders were in a constant state of flux, and it was judged advisable to move the capital from Tabriz, which was vulnerably near the Ottomans, firstly to Qazvin and then to Isfahan, but the central heart of the country was forged into a permanent unity.

Pro Dance Center

It was 5 PM sharp as we entered Pro Dance Center in Irvine. There were a group of little ballerinas gathered after their class waiting for their parents to pick them up. Their happy, energetic faces were lit up and full of energy! Today we were meeting with Nasser Maddi, the owner of this center and a professional dancer with 16 years of experience from Belgium, choregraphing for music industry pros in Europe. His dance experience includes: 14 years of hip hop, break
dance and control dance; 7 years of Cuban salsa, Rue da, and meringue; 3 years jazz; and 1 year of ballroom. Nasser’s wife Maryam Sadollahy, married four years, is the friendly face you will see in the waiting room helping out, keeping things running smoothly and making sure everyone leaves happy!

Nasser was getting ready for his next class with two of his young dancers, Mel, 24, and Molly, 18. Both of the girls are members of Nasser’s performing group called the Pro Dancers. This group of professional dancers perform for video clips, films, celebratory functions, parties, and festivals. Today the dancers happily posed for our photographer and showed us their energetic moves!
Pro Dance Center offers classes like Salsa, Belly Dancing, Hip Hop, Persian, Freestyle, Ballet, Mommy & Me and more.

So make sure you stop by the Pro Dance Center in Irvine and take advantage of the special 10% discount off the first time sign up fee as well as a free first class… exclusively for OCPC readers! And while you’re there, make sure you stop by the Pro Dancewear Boutique where you can find an eclectic selection of dance gear as well as gift items!

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