Nastaran Dibai

Nastaran Dibai has written for big hit TV sitcoms including “The Nanny,” “According to Jim,” and her latest project, “Hope and Faith” starring Kelly Ripa. But being a writer and moving up to being an executive producer has not been an easy feat! As a woman in
Hollywood, getting her foot in the door was crucial in getting her
career started. With her husband Jeffery Hodes as her writing partner, together they have indeed moved up the ladder. From getting their scripts rejected by agent after agent to being asked to take over the show “Hope and Faith” starting this August, the road has been a long one but well worth all the hard work!

Q. Tell us a little about your background as a writer

A: I have a BA in communication studies from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada, where I specialized in Film and Television. After that I did
a fellowship at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, where I specialized
in Cinematography.

Q. How did you get into writing/ producing for sitcoms?

A: This is sort of a long story. After finishing my studies at Concordia University, I was living in Montreal and mostly working in documentaries for The National Film Board of Canada (NFB). I worked on many documentaries ranging in topic from Uranium mining in Canada to disabled women to the year of the shelter for the United Nations. My documentary experience at the NFB took me around the world to places like the Philippines, Japan, Kenya, and the Canadian Arctic. Although, the experience was valuable and rewarding, I always felt I wanted to be involved in more commercial things.

That’s when I decided to apply for a fellowship at the American Film Institute (AFI) in Los Angeles. At the time, I was interested in camera work and my experience in Montreal had been mostly in the field of cinematography. Therefore, I applied to the cinematography program at the AFI. It was a very competitive process where I had to submit a portfolio and go through a lengthy interview in order to be accepted. (The AFI program is very hard to get into and only a small percentage of people applying end up getting accepted. It has gotten even more competitive since I was there in 1985.) That was the experience that changed the course of my life, because that’s when I was exposed to the American way of doing things.

After I graduated from the AFI program I headed back to Montreal to see if I could find work in a more commercial venue, but that proved to be difficult. It’s always hard getting work in the entertainment industry, but when you’re a woman and you’ve trained in a technical side (cinematography), it’s even harder. I had work, but it was very sporadic. So, having already been bit by the Hollywood bug, I headed back to L.A.

While I was trying to get settled and looking for work, a friend of mine asked if I wanted to work as his assistant in order to make some money. This was a friend I went to school with in Canada and he had moved to L.A. in order to pursue a career in writing. He had a difficult time starting out, but eventually he got on a show and started to work consistently. I planned on continuing my search for work in cinematography, but in the meantime I figured I could work as my friend’s assistant in order to make some living cash. However, as I watched him work, I started to think maybe I could take a stab at writing for sitcoms. I always enjoyed writing and everyone always said I was funny. I figured, why not. And I realized writers make very good money – much better than cinematographers. Besides, I had my friend, who was already an established sitcom writer who could give me guidance. He told me in order to get an agent and get in the door I need to write a “spec” script. “Spec” is short for speculation, which meant I would have to write a sample script from an already existing show. At the time, I was working at a studio where there were many writers, like my friend, and each of those writers had assistants, like me. I soon saw that most of the assistants were also aspiring writers. We would all go out to lunch and talk about how we were all working on our “spec” scripts and trying to get agents to represent us. One of those assistants was a really smart, funny, man who I really enjoyed talking to about writing and life in general. So, we decided that we would become a writing team and write our spec script together. Long story short, sixteen years later, that man (Jeffrey Hodes) is now my husband and my writing partner. In the beginning, everytime we got together to work on our spec script it was a date.

We got married soon after we met (about 8 months later), and struggled for a few years writing spec script after spec script and getting turned down by agent after agent. But we had confidence in our work and we just kept plugging along. If I’d ever realized how hard the road ahead would be when I started, I don’t think I would’ve pursued a career in writing, but when we were in the middle of doing it, we just kept our eye on the prize. After many rejections and lots of maybe-we’re-not-good-enough-to-do-this discussions, we were finally able to land our first agent. Through him we got several free-lance assignments, but our ultimate goal was to be on the writing staff of an existing show. Eventually, we got our first job on staff and the person who gave us the job was, guess who,
my friend who hired me as his assistant. Since then we’ve worked our way up the ladder.

Q. Has comedy always come naturally to you?

A: I wouldn’t say I’m the funniest person in the world, and I’m certainly not stand-up funny, but I’ve always been able to make people laugh. I’ve always had an affinity for American sitcoms. Even when I was growing up in Iran (I moved when I was 9), I remember watching episodes of “I Love Lucy” endlessly. I couldn’t get enough of them and I’ve probably seen every episode over 20 times. When my family and I moved to the U.S. and then to Canada, I grew up watching classic American sitcoms like “All In The Family”, “Maude”, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”, “The Bob Newhart Show”, and “The Carol Burnett Show.” Later in my teens I enjoyed, “Happy Days”, “The Love Boat”, “Taxi”, and the sitcom that made me want to do this for a living, “Cheers”. My parents worried that I watched too much TV, but I learned the English language and American culture watching those shows, and now that I’m making a living doing it, I guess they feel it wasn’t all wasted time sitting in front of the TV.

Q. What challenges have you faced in the course of your career?

A: The biggest challenge we faced was actually getting our foot in the door when we first started. Finding and agent, getting that first job, and doing well enough to get hired again. However, there are always challenges along the way. One thing I’ll never get used to is rejection. It’s always hard and heart-breaking and it happens to everyone when they’ve been doing it long enough.

Q. What is the latest project you are working on?

A: In May of this year, we were asked by ABC and Touchstone Television to take over the show “Hope and Faith” with Kelly Ripa and Faith Ford as executive producers. However, in order to do this we had to move to New York City, where the show is shot. Almost all sitcoms are shot in L.A., but “Hope and Faith” is an exception. It has to be shot in New York because of Kelly Ripa’s schedule who also does Live With Regis and Kelly every morning and lives in NYC. After being on “According to Jim” for four years, we thought taking over “Hope and Faith” would be a good challenge for us. The network wanted to make some tonal changes to the show and we were pleased to know that they were willing to put their trust in us. We have not started production yet (it starts at the beginning of August), but so far we’ve done 5 weeks of pre-production and things seem to be on track.

Q. Any favorite moments?

A: My favorite moments on a show have always been when you write something and finally see it performed as you had imagined in your head, and it works. That rarely happens, but when it does,
it’s a great feeling.

Kasra, Connecting the Persain community to Hollywood

The presence of U.S. based TV networks serving the Persian audience worldwide has been the raising ground for many young journalists who are
active in various fields of journalism. OCPC was able to get one-on-one with Kasra Ghanei, one of the leading journalists active in reporting on American cinema and entertainment. Kasra is an internationally recognized television reporter and personality, currently contributing to PBC television network and Tapesh Magazine. PBC is currently rated as one of the most watched Persian satellite network serving the global Persian speaking public.

It’s been a few years since satellite TV technology improvements and the proliferation of satellite dishes have linked Persian communities in the
Middle East to Persian communities living in the West, initiating a cultural communication channel between both peoples that had been largely sealed
for more than two decades.

Today, over twenty U.S.-based television networks serve the Persian community with American and Persian made content and programming. These outlets, who compete fervently with each other, rely on meager advertisement revenues that serve as the only source of their delicate existence. Aside from the difficulties, however, which are mostly creative, financial and resource oriented– not uncommon even among their American counterparts, few of these media outlets along with their journalists are playing a major role in connecting the Persian community to American culture and society.

Generally speaking, reporters such as Kasra agree that the Persian speaking television viewer is a Western-exposed viewer with enormous interest in American cinema and culture. “Dating back several hundred years, the
significant influence of British, French and later American cultures and arts
on contemporary Persian society and lifestyles, has instilled an anecdotal fascination for Western offerings among Persians” says Kasra . He continues
to add that “This fascination continues to exist today, in particular, when dealing with Hollywood films and celebrities.”

Kasra who himself admits to bearing a deep interest in American arts and cinema, has been active in the frontlines of Hollywood’s biggest events and gatherings. Persian T.V. viewers have become accustomed to watching him interview America’s biggest stars and celebrities from the red carpet. From
his unprecedented interviews with celebrities such as Brad Pitt, Omar Sharif, Adam Sandler, John Travolta, Brendan Fraser, John Voight, James Caan,
Terry Hatcher, Ed Harris, Salma Hayek, Joel Silver, Christian Bale and
George Clooney, to his most recent interviews with the legendary directors Steven Spielberg and James Cameron, Kasra has proven to be an effective journalist reporting from the heart of American entertainment’s biggest events.
In many instances, Kasra believes that “reporters like [himself] have been the only representatives of the Persian speaking community” at important international conventions and gatherings. Recently, when star-athlete David Beckham was in Los Angeles at the opening events of the David Beckham Soccer Academy of Los Angeles, the young journalist was there to grab a
one-on-one interview with the celebrity soccer player.

The interview was aired as part of a David Beckham program special which rated very high among the millions of viewers who tuned in worldwide. Or, in another occasion, Kasra was able to place his microphone in front of Oscar-winning film maker Michael Moore and grab the latest scoop on his upcoming project that may or may not be a sequel to Fahrenheit 911. This kind of
access to important international luminaries is notable for the Persian community, as they feel caught up to the events that are occurring all around their communities. But, more importantly, they feel a closer connection to the rest
of American community.

Persian journalists have been instrumental in the discovery of the rising trend
that proves Persian actors, writers and filmmakers are, more than ever before, connected to many of Hollywood’s best motion pictures. While most Persians are aware of Shohreh Aghdashloo’s magnificent performance in House of Sand and Fog (earning her the well-deserved Oscar nomination), there are also other great Persian artists with which the community is not as familiar. One example would be when Kasra met the talented Massy Tadjedin, the screenwriter for
the Hollywood film titled The Jacket, starring the Oscar winning actor Adrien Brody. Once Kasra interviewed Massy on the red carpet, he learned that she was indeed a 27 year old Persian writer/film maker with an English degree
from Harvard. Or at the premier of Oscar winning producer and writer Paul Haggis’ stunning film, Crash, Kasra was able to interview the two Persian
actors in the film, Shaun Toub and Bahar Soomekh, along with Paul Haggis himself. Many remember Paul Haggis from his Best Picture Oscar winning
film, Million Dollar Baby.

The news of these overachievers’ success serves as inspiration to Persian artists, no matter where they live in the world. It also serves as a reminder to the Persian community that their artists are involved in the very center of American culture and society

Reporting on arts and cinema is comparable to light US entertainment
for most Persians living in the U.S. and abroad. However, if it wasn’t for journalists such as Kasra, the Persian community would not be able to learn about the achievements of these hard working artists. Without that, it’s
unlikely that our community would be able to uphold its artists. Fortunately,
such journalism serves as an important bridge between the two cultures and
that is very rare to find in today’s geopolitical environment.

Lion and Sun

I had the pleasure of sitting down with Shahryar in early May to talk about
what has been going on with him since we last spoke almost a year ago. For
our readers who remember our first article back in August, Shahryar had just come out with his debut album appropriately titled Sweet Beginning, with hit songs including “Niaz” and “Bitab”. But that wasn’t the last we would hear from Shahryar – he has done it once again. His new album, Parseh, was officially released in March with cutting edge arrangements by Roma Kanyan and deep and intense lyrics by artists such as Jaklin and Shahyar Ghanbari. And this time, his record label (Chehreh Nama) not only produced his album but also distributed it – something that makes a huge difference in how widely the album gets distributed. After its release, feedback from his fans was amazing – the
CD has been selling at an unbelievable rate, first in Europe and now here in
the states.

“Do you know the meaning of ‘Parseh’?” Asked Shahryar as we began the interview. I actually did not know the meaning of the word when I first picked
up his CD so I had to ask! Parseh means to wander or drift. It is the name of the title track which starts off with a piano solo and continues to be a beautiful love ballad. Shahryar’s main focus this time around was to start a new concept –
poetic and intense lyrics combined with catchy beats.

“I wanted to introduce the young generation to these beautiful lyrics using good beats and rhythm,” explained Shahryar. “To turn the deep lyrics of a poet like Shahyar Ghanbari and put a 6/8 beat on it is not very common to do!”
Shahryar has also used the talent of two young poets in Iran, Mehdi Moradi and Omid Hashemi, who wrote the lyrics for the songs “Setayesh”, which is one of the hit songs of this album, and “Javuneh”, respectively. He also has a track named “Baghe Khial”, which has a vocal/euro-trance feel to it, written by a southern California poet named Bijan Saeedi. So from world famous to up and coming poets, Shahryar has created an album that will truly get you hooked.

How did this album come about? After a strenuous experience making his first album, Shahryar wasn’t sure if he wanted to go through making another album, but through the energy he got from his fans and from emails and praise from all over the world, he was inspired to make another album. After much thought and planning with arranger Roma Kanyan, in a record breaking 12 months, he
completed Parseh. If you recall from our first interview, Shahryar has his degree in Architectural Design so he explained that this CD in some ways was sketched and created like a work of art and of course lets not forget that Shahryar’s talents go beyond just singing. Having played the piano since the age of 11, he is a true musician who composes a lot of his tracks himself.

Since the release of Parseh, Shahryar has performed at a number of locations
in southern California attracting large crowds of his loyal fans everywhere he goes. In fact, turn to our “Where Was OCPC” page to see pictures from his album release party in Hollywood! Currently he is touring Europe and Canada and hopefully soon we will have the pleasure of seeing him in concert here in Orange County.

Real Life Back in the “OC””

Leaving Berkeley was a life decision that was not easy to make. Not only was it the city of my college experience, it was home to one of the happiest and most memorable periods of my life. If you’ve never been to Berkeley, let me try to give you a quick visual. First, it’s hard to believe that the city is part of America as it is so different, it might as well be a country of its own. Some like to call it “”Bob Marley Town.”””Mom and pop” stores are abundant and they compliment the street vendors of Telegraph Avenue quite well. The campus architecture is one of classical brilliance and the number of homeless people, an important component to the city, remind the passerby of the reality of life on a daily basis, something rare to Orange County and the countless other bubbles abundant in America. The element I love most about Berkeley is its people. I would argue I learned more from the people than the professors as the city is abounding with some of the most creative, intelligent, compassionate, and worldly people I have ever come across. So to say the least, it was difficult for me to make the fateful decision to come to southern California for law school rather than stay in the bay area as I did enjoy both options. After all, I’d have to make it home sooner or later and although Berkeley and all its memories are close to my heart, Orange County is home.

I returned home to OC early June and I had an interesting time adjusting to life here, especially since I’ve been away for four years. Everything has changed, well, at least to me. The OC landscape has been further developed. Wholesome Choice has become a center point in Irvine. Magazines like OCPC have been born from the Iranian diaspora community here in OC while southern California universities and colleges have finally begun to pay attention to Iran’s rich history and official language by instituting Persian language courses and Iran history classes, something very integral to my college experience in Berkeley. The people have changed as well, for better or worse. I’m not an authority on standards, but on a superficial level, it does seem that the kids I grew up here have changed drastically in many respects. The Honda Civics have been traded in for luxury cars and a man’s chest full of hair has been exchanged for a waxed one to compliment the thinned eyebrows above (some things I just don’t understand)! The cats have been replaced with little fluffy dogs. Some things, however, remain the same. Although my generation has grown up, many still don’t care about the world beyond their own. A political discussion or an exchange of ideas pertaining to Iran or the Middle East is still taboo, but the practice of gossiping is very widespread.

Whatever it is, OC is a place with different meanings to different people. After being gone for so long, it is a bit easier for me to view OC from an outsider’s perspective. As I continue to start the next chapter of my life here in OC, I will document this place’s complexities from a unique perspective.

Heart Savers

It’s rare among us to go in for a checkup when there are no apparent signs of illness. However, you may be surprised!

Early detection can reveal asymptomatic and often life-threatening diseases generally not detectable by physical exams in preventing possible health risks that we may not be aware of.

Heart Savers is a pioneer of this technology. It is a state-of-the-art institute for heart, lung, and body imaging with a new focus on dermatology. The center is directed by Nazie Fallah who has over 20 years of experience in the diagnostic medical field and beauty therapy. She has been the director at Heart Savers since 2004 and manages every aspect of business as well as consultations; with the exception of medical decision makings. Alongside Nazie is a team
of highly trained professionals dedicated to
the highest degree of knowledge and
patient satisfaction.

Dr. Matthew J. Budoff is the medical director of Heart Savors. He is well known for his research and works on EBCT and is extensively involved in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Hossein Alimadadian is the director of cardiology at the center who has been a practicing cardiologist for 25 years. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and interventional cardiology.

On the technical side there is Michael Sells. He is a Radiology Technologist who works with advanced systems such as 3D imaging to draw accurate readings from the procedures.

With such an outstanding team of professionals, Heart Savers uses only the highest technology for customer care.

The Electron Beam Computerized Tomography (EBCT) is the only FDA approved system that accurately images calcified plaque in the arteries. Moreover, it produces 30% less radiation exposure than conventional CT’s. According to Nazie, “There are only 6 or 7 health centers in all of southern California that carry this device”. This preventive systems’ painless yet effective procedure provides accurate results while reducing the risks of high- dose radiation. Methods of colonoscopy and invasive angiography, which are normally associated with extreme anxiety, are no longer an issue with EBCT. It does not require any tube insertions or lengthy procedures; hence patients won’t have to avoid regular checkups.

The Center for Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser (CCD) is the dermatology department at the center. It is equipped with the newest technology for various skin treatments run by a team of experts whose experiences are accountable.

Dr. John L. Peterson is the Medical Director of CCD whose long-term practice is greatly acknowledgeable. His clinical expertise is in general and cosmetic dermatology. He serves his patients best with the combination of his accomplishments and an ongoing devotion.

Janet Petterson is the Registered Nurse of CCD with over 25 years of experience. Her specialty in laser treatment and aesthetic dermatology is highly creditable. Her care for patients is her top quality that leads to outstanding results.

One of these advancements is LightSheer laser hair removal. It is a safe and effective method for removing unwanted hair for all skin types, including ethnic and tanned skin.

ClearLight is a gateway for a clear skin. It uses the Acne PhotoClearing (APC) technology to destroy the most common bacteria that causes acne. It is quick, painless, and effective on all skin types. ClearLight is UV safe with no known side effects, which makes this medical breakthrough a miracle worker.

SilkPeel Dermal lnfusion is a breakthrough treatment that combines exfoliation with deep delivery of skin-specific solutions to improve and revitalize your skin.

Last but not least the Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) technology corrects a variety of skin conditions such as facial skin imperfections, signs of photo aging, birthmarks, unwanted hair, unsightly small veins, and much more. This system provides superior cosmetic results that never fail.

The advanced dermatology and preventive body imaging at Heart Savers, located in the St. Joseph Medical Center in Irvine, is a safe and affordable breakthrough to most of your internal and external medical needs. Heart Savers is a step away from a healthier, happier, and more confident you!

Cover Story Kamran & Hooman’s New Album: “20”

After nearly two years of anticipation Kamran and Hooman released their
long awaited album “20”. This summer sensation has topped charts since its release in June, becoming the number one selling album at VIRGIN RECORDS in Dubai, and has maintained its number one position since its release on eworldrecords.com, fueled by fans of all ages vying to get their hands on this musical masterpiece. Innovative, energetic and dynamic, “20” is a fresh breeze
to the stagnant and repetitive Iranian musical scene. Unquestionably, Kamran and Hooman’s youthful approach to music, along with their inclusion of various harmonic elements, such as R&B, Hip Hop, Dance, Latin influences and ambient electronic beats has sealed this duo’s fate as an integral force in the new era of Iranian pop music.

Since parting ways from the Black Cats in search of greater artistic freedom,
the two brothers are determined to create original, quality music. A majority of the lyrics on “20” are the product of poetic prodigy Maryam Heydarzadeh. Her insightful, romantic and moving poetry is beautifully paired with the acoustic engineering of Ramin Zamani. Zamani has been a pioneering force in Persian music, producing many of the most sought-after and notable releases of the time.

To add to Kamran and Hooman’s success is their music video’s debut
on MTV Europe, creating an international demand for the album while simultaneously introducing Iranian music to the wider, global music market.
Their concerts have sold out one after another from fans who can’t seem to
get enough. An upcoming concert scheduled for Thanksgiving 2005 at the Universal Amphitheater is also highly anticipated.

The Avang Music Company, which has spearheaded this production, is scheduling a music video shoot for “Fadayeh Saret,” directed by Armin
Hashemi in September. Avang is very pleased with its cooperation with
Kamran and Hooman and anticipates further cooperation between Avang
and the two brothers.

Persia The Giant Empire

With the disintegration of the Mongol II Khan empire in the 1330s a number of small local dynasties appeared, usually only locally effective, and often founded by former Mongol officers and administrators.

The Muzaffarids were considerable patrons of art, including acting as patrons to the great poet Hafiz, but their main activity appears to have been architectural. It is as creators of the southern Iranian school that they will best be remembered.

The great centers of Muzaffarid power were in Yazd, Kirman and Isfahan. From the constructional point of view, two complexes in Yazd are important: the mosque known as the Vaqt-u Sa’at and certain sections of the Jami’ Mosque.

The Jami’ Mosque of Kirman was built in 1349 shortly after the Muzaffarids acquired the city, and its decoration appears fully fledged with no apparent or obvious precursors. Prior to this period, color had been used comparatively sparingly to highlight specific architectural points; glazed bricks were used to create patterns on a field of unglazed bricks, and small strips of glazed terracotta were employed to create a form of strapwork. In the magnificent mausoleum of Uljaytu at Sultaniyya, built before 1317, small sections of complete tile mosaic appear for the first time, but are no preparation for the sheer mass of the tile mosaic which is encountered in the Kirman Jami’ Mosque.

There were very few remaining monuments in Iran which can be attributed to the Jalayirids, but in 1419 they did add the great minaret to the Jami’ Mosque at Shushtar. Its decoration is almost archaic when compared to contemporary Timurid minarets, consisting as it does solely of blue-glazed bricks forming designs in a diaper trellis formation against the unglazed brick minaret shaft. Such decoration took no account of the developments in southern Iran nor of the entire Timurid artistic revolution, and would appear to emphasize the total separation of the Mesopotamian area from the rest of Iran at this time.

The Timurids 1370-1506

Timur used his base in Transoxiana in Soviet Central Asia as the nucleus for a great empire, conquering northeast Iran in the early 1380s, and the remainder
by 1393; thereafter he turned north and penetrated as far as Moscow in
1395, before sacking Delhi in India in 1398, and then moving across half of
Asia to defeat the Ottomans at Ankara in Turkey in 1402.

The advent of Timur himself can generally be regarded as a disaster. In 35 years of campaigning he left an endless trail of death and destruction, only saving the craftsmen from the countless pyramids of skulls which was his custom to erect outside capture cities.

The great glory of the Timurid perior, however, was the magnificent title mosaic work which reached its highest achievement at this time. Under the Muzaffarids, the concept of an overall tile mosaic pattern appeared for the first time, and the palette was considerably extended, but under Timurid patronage the various colors achieved subtlety which was unsurpassed. Each color appeared in a number of slightly varying shades, so that in the flower panels in particular delicate tones were used to give shading and depth to the compositions. The finest examples of this technique appeared in Herat and Samarqand, the two great Timurid capitals, but a number of examples were also to be seen in Iran in the royal foundations at Mahshhad and Khargird, and some superb examples of a slightly more provincial character at Varzana and Isfahan.

Much of this magnificence only appeared in Central Asia and the area around Herat, while deeper within Iran the styles more subject to Persian tradition and adapted to conform to an older usage which nonetheless undoubtedly benefitted from the infusion of these new ideas. Consequently many of the Timurid monuments in Iran show all these characteristics, but are much more restrained
in their use. These developments also continued in the second half of the fifteenth century mainly in the eastern part of the country, because in the west and northwest at this time two Turkmen confederations appeared which effectively blocked the Timurid westward expansion and indeed limited the later Timurids
to Khurasan only.

Fine Art Adel Rakhshani

Creativity occurs in every field of human endeavor, not just in the arts. Whenever people express original ideas, they are being creative. The ability of creative people to accept disorder also extends to their working methods. In order to venture into new ideas, artists must disrupt old ones, creating disorder in the process before achieving a new kind of order.

Adel has reached the point where he has given up the objective representation of his surroundings in order to reach the summit of the true unmasked art and form. This vantage point to view life through is the prism of his pure artistic feeling. Adel follows Expressionism, which was planted in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His tendencies such as distortion of form and intensification of color, has surfaced since his earliest works of art.

Adel looked to these artistic precendents to find forms that would express the intensity of feeling that he believes is part of the Iranian cultural tradition. Adel has also created many different masks which he believes are like the hiding of your identity while communicating a frightening ferocity. He believes his masks are magical objects that add a mysterious potency to the work.

In the past, Adel has done many children’s books in Farsi and English. Now in continuation of that he is producing a series of puppet shows that tries to teach young Iranian children the meaning of life. “”Iranian children here in America are losing their heritage and roots. We are responsible for keeping our great culture alive,”” Adel explained.

On the side, Adel is the president of the Iranian – American Artist Society in Los Angeles who meet on a monthly basis. We at OCPC wish Adel much success in all his future endeavors!

Cal Poly Pomona

It’s rare among us to go in for a checkup when there are no apparent signs of illness. However, you may be surprised!

Early detection can reveal asymptomatic and often life-threatening diseases generally not detectable by physical exams in preventing possible health risks that we may not be aware of.

Heart Savers is a pioneer of this technology. It is a state-of-the-art institute for heart, lung, and body imaging with a new focus on dermatology. The center is directed by Nazie Fallah who has over 20 years of experience in the diagnostic medical field and beauty therapy. She has been the director at Heart Savers since 2004 and manages every aspect of business as well as consultations; with the exception of medical decision makings. Alongside Nazie is a team
of highly trained professionals dedicated to
the highest degree of knowledge and
patient satisfaction.

Dr. Matthew J. Budoff is the medical director of Heart Savors. He is well known for his research and works on EBCT and is extensively involved in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Hossein Alimadadian is the director of cardiology at the center who has been a practicing cardiologist for 25 years. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and interventional cardiology.

On the technical side there is Michael Sells. He is a Radiology Technologist who works with advanced systems such as 3D imaging to draw accurate readings from the procedures.

With such an outstanding team of professionals, Heart Savers uses only the highest technology for customer care.

The Electron Beam Computerized Tomography (EBCT) is the only FDA approved system that accurately images calcified plaque in the arteries. Moreover, it produces 30% less radiation exposure than conventional CT’s. According to Nazie, “There are only 6 or 7 health centers in all of southern California that carry this device”. This preventive systems’ painless yet effective procedure provides accurate results while reducing the risks of high- dose radiation. Methods of colonoscopy and invasive angiography, which are normally associated with extreme anxiety, are no longer an issue with EBCT. It does not require any tube insertions or lengthy procedures; hence patients won’t have to avoid regular checkups.

The Center for Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser (CCD) is the dermatology department at the center. It is equipped with the newest technology for various skin treatments run by a team of experts whose experiences are accountable.

Dr. John L. Peterson is the Medical Director of CCD whose long-term practice is greatly acknowledgeable. His clinical expertise is in general and cosmetic dermatology. He serves his patients best with the combination of his accomplishments and an ongoing devotion.

Janet Petterson is the Registered Nurse of CCD with over 25 years of experience. Her specialty in laser treatment and aesthetic dermatology is highly creditable. Her care for patients is her top quality that leads to outstanding results.

One of these advancements is LightSheer laser hair removal. It is a safe and effective method for removing unwanted hair for all skin types, including ethnic and tanned skin.

ClearLight is a gateway for a clear skin. It uses the Acne PhotoClearing (APC) technology to destroy the most common bacteria that causes acne. It is quick, painless, and effective on all skin types. ClearLight is UV safe with no known side effects, which makes this medical breakthrough a miracle worker.

SilkPeel Dermal lnfusion is a breakthrough treatment that combines exfoliation with deep delivery of skin-specific solutions to improve and revitalize your skin.

Last but not least the Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) technology corrects a variety of skin conditions such as facial skin imperfections, signs of photo aging, birthmarks, unwanted hair, unsightly small veins, and much more. This system provides superior cosmetic results that never fail.

The advanced dermatology and preventive body imaging at Heart Savers, located in the St. Joseph Medical Center in Irvine, is a safe and affordable breakthrough to most of your internal and external medical needs. Heart Savers is a step away from a healthier, happier, and more confident you!

Dining Out Hatam A Family Restaurant in Mission Viejo

“”Where is a good place to go for authentic Persian food?”” How many times have your non-Persian friends asked you that question? Well, a few weeks ago we decided to go and check out a local Persian restaurant in the neighborhood called Hatam. It’s a cozy little place with a friendly environment and great hospitality. “”We serve fresh, homemade food all day every day,”” said owner Babak Kashkouli. Their specialties include, of course, kabob with the famous basmati rice on the side, as well as stews like Ghorme Sabzi, Gheime Bademjan, Abgousht, Fesenjan, Karafs, Koofteh, Tahchin, Bamieh and Kotlet; Ash and specialties like Soltani, Barg, Baghalipolo with Mahiche and more!

” “We use the freshest ingredients on a day to day basis,”” Babak explained. “”My sister Afsaneh Kashkouli manages the restaurant together with our serving manager Ali Shafiee.””

Aside from dining in, Hatam is best known for their catering and to-go services. Even while we were there they received two catering orders! So if you don’t have time to come in for a sit down meal, you can always order to-go!

“Anytime you want to come in during our business hours, we promise you the best quality service and food. We’ll treat you like a member of the royal family! And for OCPC readers, we offer an appetizer or a side dish with any entree!”” said Babak.

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