The Premier of “The Keeper: The Legend of Omar Khayyam”

Young Professionals in the Community

John Fuentes Photography
John Fuentes has been a freelance photographer for the past 15 years. He has won several competitive awards for scenic, nature, and special effects photography in Alaska while stationed in Eielson AFB, serving in the United States Air Force.

His passions for artistically capturing time and events have been recognized by his clients and peers.

With a career in the Hospitality Industry, he gained the necessary interpersonal skills to capture his clients at their best. From his charismatic demeanor and caring for each client, he will ensure your comfort to gain the ultimate portrait for you.

John specializes in “Story Telling Photography” or “Candid Photography” that captures children, individuals, couples, and families within their environment or selected location. Also, with the assistance of CYRUS Productions in Laguna Hills, you have the option of a “Traditional Style”, studio controlled portrait. John has also added to his resume Weddings, Engagements, and Personal/Professional Event Photography.

Interview with Kourosh Pirnazar
by: Shaghayegh Farsijani

Tell us a little about what you do?

I do storyboards for Gold Pictures for a new TV project called SIN. I work there as a Production Assistant, so when they go out to shoot documentaries or any other outdoor shoots, such as corporate videos, I will go and do it under their name.

How did you get into Film?

I orginally started to become an animator but the problem there was as an animator you have to be really consistent; by drawing the same thing over and over again with small changes. I could draw both pictures but they just weren’t alike, so I decided to go into “stop motion animation” which is when figures are really there and you just have to shoot them. That was the first time I actually got behind the camera and decided to direct and set up shots. From then on I went into movie making. The movie that encouraged me to go into this field was “Saving Private Ryan”. The way the movie was made just fascinated me, so throughout high school I made short films with my cousins and friends. I went to the film school at Cal State Long Beach for four years and will be graduating this semester. While I was studying I worked on short films and documentaries and that is when I met a lady by the name of Melissa who helped me get this internship.

How did you become familiar with OCPC?

Exactly one year ago my mom brought the magazine home and I started flipping through the pages when I saw Mr. Danosian and I said, “Oh my god! That is my art teacher!” From then on I started reading the magazine every month.

Final thoughts?

It is good to get involved with this magazine or just the Persian community in general because no matter what you are involved with, you are helping the community. As you know, the LA and Orange County area have a huge Persian community so you should do a lot to get involved.

UCR Fundraising Event

Sergeant Jennifer Shawhan
I joined the Army when I was 20 years old. I am a paratrooper and a Motor Transport operator. I worked with the Special Forces Training Group in Ft. Bragg, NC for 4 years on active duty. I then joined the Army Reserves and was stationed in Camp Pendleton, CA for 3 years. I was deployed to Iraq for 15 months as a S.A.W. gunner on the gun truck providing security for convoys. I have been in the Army for 8 years and I majored in Graphic Design. I was born in Wisconsin, my parents were Missionaries and we traveled a lot. I grew up helping others.

Specialist Zohra Azizi from Afghanistan
I am the first in my family to join the United States Military born in Afghanistan. I moved to Iran for 2 years, lived in Pakistan for 3 years and now am living in San Diego. I joined the Army on April 2001. I went to Iraq on Jan 2003 until April 2004. I am married and have one daughter. Everybody in my family lives in the U.S. I really loved my experience in the Army. I hope more women would join the armed forces. I speak Dari & English.

Sergeant Tafiq Rashid
I joined the Army 4 years ago. I have been trained in Transportation & military police. After 9/11, I volunteered 10 months of active duty services and I was shortly activated for Operation: Iraq Freedom. I served in Karballa & Najaf in Iraq. I speak Arabic & English. I am the oldest of five children in my family and we all grew up here in Northern California.

Sergeant David Moezzi
My name is David Moezzi. I was born in San Francisco, CA. My father is from Tehran, Iran, and my mother is from Russia. I have been in the military for 13 years in the U.S. Marine Corp Infantry and 3 years in the Marines. I served in the Army National Guard and as a Military Police Officer. I went to college using tuition assistance and the army’s G.I. Bill. I graduated from the University of Las Vegas with a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice. I then worked as a correctional officer in Las Vegas, NV. After 9/11, I felt the need to serve in the military to assist in the global war on terror. I speak Farsi, Portuguese, Russian and now studying Arabic.

Persia The Giant Empire

With the disintegration of the Mongol II Khan empire in the 1330s a number of small local dynasties appeared, usually only locally effective, and often founded by former Mongol officers and administrators.

The Muzaffarids were considerable patrons of art, including acting as patrons to the great poet Hafiz, but their main activity appears to have been architectural. It is as creators of the southern Iranian school that they will best be remembered.

The great centers of Muzaffarid power were in Yazd, Kirman and Isfahan. From the constructional point of view, two complexes in Yazd are important: the mosque known as the Vaqt-u Sa’at and certain sections of the Jami’ Mosque.

The Jami’ Mosque of Kirman was built in 1349 shortly after the Muzaffarids acquired the city, and its decoration appears fully fledged with no apparent or obvious precursors. Prior to this period, color had been used comparatively sparingly to highlight specific architectural points; glazed bricks were used to create patterns on a field of unglazed bricks, and small strips of glazed terracotta were employed to create a form of strapwork. In the magnificent mausoleum of Uljaytu at Sultaniyya, built before 1317, small sections of complete tile mosaic appear for the first time, but are no preparation for the sheer mass of the tile mosaic which is encountered in the Kirman Jami’ Mosque.

There were very few remaining monuments in Iran which can be attributed to the Jalayirids, but in 1419 they did add the great minaret to the Jami’ Mosque at Shushtar. Its decoration is almost archaic when compared to contemporary Timurid minarets, consisting as it does solely of blue-glazed bricks forming designs in a diaper trellis formation against the unglazed brick minaret shaft. Such decoration took no account of the developments in southern Iran nor of the entire Timurid artistic revolution, and would appear to emphasize the total separation of the Mesopotamian area from the rest of Iran at this time.

The Timurids 1370-1506

Timur used his base in Transoxiana in Soviet Central Asia as the nucleus for a great empire, conquering northeast Iran in the early 1380s, and the remainder
by 1393; thereafter he turned north and penetrated as far as Moscow in
1395, before sacking Delhi in India in 1398, and then moving across half of
Asia to defeat the Ottomans at Ankara in Turkey in 1402.

The advent of Timur himself can generally be regarded as a disaster. In 35 years of campaigning he left an endless trail of death and destruction, only saving the craftsmen from the countless pyramids of skulls which was his custom to erect outside capture cities.

The great glory of the Timurid perior, however, was the magnificent title mosaic work which reached its highest achievement at this time. Under the Muzaffarids, the concept of an overall tile mosaic pattern appeared for the first time, and the palette was considerably extended, but under Timurid patronage the various colors achieved subtlety which was unsurpassed. Each color appeared in a number of slightly varying shades, so that in the flower panels in particular delicate tones were used to give shading and depth to the compositions. The finest examples of this technique appeared in Herat and Samarqand, the two great Timurid capitals, but a number of examples were also to be seen in Iran in the royal foundations at Mahshhad and Khargird, and some superb examples of a slightly more provincial character at Varzana and Isfahan.

Much of this magnificence only appeared in Central Asia and the area around Herat, while deeper within Iran the styles more subject to Persian tradition and adapted to conform to an older usage which nonetheless undoubtedly benefitted from the infusion of these new ideas. Consequently many of the Timurid monuments in Iran show all these characteristics, but are much more restrained
in their use. These developments also continued in the second half of the fifteenth century mainly in the eastern part of the country, because in the west and northwest at this time two Turkmen confederations appeared which effectively blocked the Timurid westward expansion and indeed limited the later Timurids
to Khurasan only.

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